catherineaddington:

I had kind of a nerd-out this morning. But I felt like everyone needed to know about this.
catherineaddington:

I had kind of a nerd-out this morning. But I felt like everyone needed to know about this.
catherineaddington:

I had kind of a nerd-out this morning. But I felt like everyone needed to know about this.
catherineaddington:

I had kind of a nerd-out this morning. But I felt like everyone needed to know about this.
catherineaddington:

I had kind of a nerd-out this morning. But I felt like everyone needed to know about this.
catherineaddington:

I had kind of a nerd-out this morning. But I felt like everyone needed to know about this.
catherineaddington:

I had kind of a nerd-out this morning. But I felt like everyone needed to know about this.
catherineaddington:

I had kind of a nerd-out this morning. But I felt like everyone needed to know about this.

catherineaddington:

I had kind of a nerd-out this morning. But I felt like everyone needed to know about this.

(via invisiblemoose)

fleurnymph:

hey a wee PSA to aussie/nz women who are strapped for cash at the moment - remember you can order free sample packs of pads & tampons and stuff from Poise, U by Kotex and Carefree on their websites! 

(via shedresseskindaprochoice)

flowergirlrobichiko:

stardust-rain:

stardust-rain:

sometimes tumblr’s US-centric social justice makes me so fucking frustrated. Right now sweden’s third biggest party are literally neo-nazis and our elections couldn’t even get onto trending tags today, goddamit.

Okay, so the…

salparadisewasright:

estufar:

An actual headline from The New York Times in 1919 


I love this so much.

salparadisewasright:

estufar:

An actual headline from The New York Times in 1919 

I love this so much.

(via orcasoup)

the whittler (ii)

dapperfly:

whittled man,
you stand in the closet
and appear to be
a coathanger
(all wire)
with your clothes clinging to every corner

and I wonder
how you got your
whittled
scars
fingers
blades
(for your bones, they cut,
and you nurse my wounds
after I have touched them)

whittled man
you say nothing,
but your smile moves
freckles
constellations
(a universe of sharp
pretty things)
and carves in me
a whittled lover
(a whittled heart)
to love a
whittled man

                                       c.m. perry


(via saycheese-louise)

I woke like dis?????

ambidexterous:

overanalyticalqueer:

so hey fun fact for anyone who wants queer history trivia: the first disco in Seattle was opened in 1973 and was a gay bar called “shelly’s leg” and it was named after a dancer named shelly who lost her leg in a confetti cannon accident and used the insurance/lawsuit settlement money to open a gay disco.

a) This is such a fantastic story that I wouldn’t care if it were made up, except that

b) upon further research, it does appear to be true

(via dragonslaeyr)

When I close my laptop, it goes to sleep. It’s a curiously domestic metaphor but it also implies that sleep in humans and other animals is just a kind of low-power standby mode. (Do computers dream of electric sleep?) Last year, Apple announced a twist on this idea: a new feature for the Mac operating system called “Power Nap”. Using Power Nap, your computer can do important things even while asleep, receiving updates and performing backups.

The name Power Nap comes from the term describing the thrusting executive’s purported ability to catch a restorative forty winks in 20 minutes but the functioning of Apple’s feature symbolically implies a yet more ultra-modern and frankly inhuman aspiration: to be “productive” even while dozing. It is the uncanny technological embodiment of the dream most blatantly sold to us by those work-from-home scams online, which promise that you can “make money even while you sleep”.

Sleep, indeed, is a standing affront to capitalism. That is the argument of Jonathan Crary’s provocative and fascinating essay, which takes “24/7” as a spectral umbrella term for round-the-clock consumption and production in today’s world. The human power nap is a macho response to what Crary notes is the alarming shrinkage of sleep in modernity. “The average North American adult now sleeps approximately six and a half hours a night,” he observes, which is “an erosion from eight hours a generation ago” and “ten hours in the early 20th century”.

Back in 1996, Stanley Coren’s book Sleep Thieves blamed insufficient rest for industrial disasters such as the Chernobyl meltdown. Crary is worried about the encroachment on sleep because it represents one of the last remaining zones of dissidence, of anti-productivity and even of solidarity. Isn’t it quite disgusting that, as he notices, public benches are now deliberately engineered to prevent human beings from sleeping on them?

While Apple-branded machines that take working Power Naps are figured as a more efficient species of people, people themselves are increasingly represented as apparatuses to be acted on by machines. Take the popular internet parlance of getting “eyeballs”, which means reaching an audience. “The term ‘eyeballs’ for the site of control,” Crary writes, “repositions human vision as a motor activity that can be subjected to external direction or stimuli … The eye is dislodged from the realm of optics and made into an intermediary element of a circuit whose end result is always a motor response of the body to electronic solicitation.”

You can’t get more “eyeballs” if the people to whose brains the eyeballs are physically connected are asleep. Hence the interest – currently military; before long surely commercial, too – in removing our need for sleep with drugs or other modifications. Then we would be more like efficient machines, able to “interact” with (or labour among) electronic media all day and all night. (It is strange, once you think about it, that the phrase “He’s a machine” is now supposed to be a compliment in the sporting arena and the workplace.)